skip to content

Museum of Classical Archaeology Databases

Tetrarchs

Diocletian, Maximian, Constantius Chlorus and Galerius.

After years of unrest, the four rulers were jointly in power of the Roman Empire from 282 CE; but rivalries led to the collapse of the Tetrarchy by 313. Their poses and similarity to each other is a display of political unity, just as the Empire was splitting into two halves, eastern and western.

Originally made for the Imperial Palace in Constantinople (Istanbul), the Tetrarchs were plundered by the Venetians in the thirteenth century and have remained ever since in St Mark’s Square.

This cast emulates porphyry, the expensive and unusual Egyptian stone used only for sculptures of emperors

Number: 
638
Material: 
Porphyry
Location of Original: 

In situ, St Mark’s Basilica Venice

Size: 
1.61m
Accession: 

Robert Cook bequest. Purchased from Munich Institute for Classical Archaeology, 23 May 2003

References: 

Kleiner: Roman Sculpture, 399

Date: 
c.300
Provenance: 

Originally in Constantinople

Search Casts

Use our search tools to search the Casts Archive

Museum of Classical Archaeology, Cambridge

Every cast tells two stories.
One ancient. One modern.

Admission is free.

Opening hours

Mon-Fri: 10am-5pm
Sat: 10am-1pm (Univ. term-time only)
Sun: Closed

Visit us

Museum of Classical Archaeology
Faculty of Classics
Sidgwick Avenue
Cambridge
CB3 9DA

Get in touch

Tel. +44 (0)1223 330402
Email

Facebook Twitter